Tag Archives: american privilege

A privilege game

Here’s a “step forward/step back” game of privilege. I found it on tumblr.com.

Simply count how many forward steps you have and how many back steps you have, and that’s your result. What your result means, however, is another story. (More about it later)

(Refresh if image refuses do load).

Step forward, step back

My result is 10 steps forward, 8 back.

The first thing I have to note about this list is that it reeks of US (Western) privilege. Many of the stuff listed can’t apply to the rest of the world, and there ARE people in the rest of the world, thankyouverymuch. For example, the fact I didn’t go to a private school is a perfectly expectable in my country, since private schools/universities appeared only in the past decade or so, and they all suck a big time. Plus, education was (is?) free here. And that’s just one thing.

Another thing to note is, while this sort of lists are a good for discussing privilege, they should not be taken literally- for example, the fact I was never discriminated based on my gender doesn’t mean women, in general, are not discriminated. Also, the list can be taken as a source for the dangerous, yet, popular sport, called “oppression Olympics”, which is never a good thing.

My result in details

+ means it applies to me, – that it doesn’t. f is for step forward, b for step back.

1f. My family owned their own home. +
1b. They both graduated from university and my father was a PhD. –

2f. None in my family was a doctor or a lawyer, but we’re all professionals. +
2b. Home state… You mean country? I didn’t. +

3f. There were no people of colour or working class people working for my family. –
3b. I am not black, Latina, Middle Eastern, Asian, Indian, Arab or Native American. –

4f. I did study history and culture of my ethnic group in school. +
4b. I was never denied a job or paid less because of my gender. –

5f. I’ve never written such a letter. –
5b. No incest, etc. –

6f. I am not a man. –
6b. I was raised by my mother. –

7f. I’ve never worked in a job with non-whites. –
7b. There was a problem of alcohol abuse in my family. +

8f. We had more than 50 books. +
8b. It did happen (for both personal and non-personal reasons) +

9f. They did tell me this. +
9b. No. –

10f. They did take me to galleries, museums, etc. +
10b. Yes. +

11f. No private schools. –
11b. I was taught that I police were someone to be feared. +

12f. I didn’t grow up thinking my family would pay for college because college was free. Plus, I had to work while in University. –
12b. No. (Though I didn’t understand why this is on the step back side). –

13f. I don’t believe police would help. –
13b. I was never hungry or worried as a child. –

14f. Yes. +
14b. No. –

15f. No. –
15b. Yes. +

16f. Since only white people live here, the answer is yes: all of my friends are white. If we forget about race and put “ethnicity” then no, most of my friends are not of the same ethnicity as I am. –
16b. No. –

17f. If we’re talking about race, then yes. +
17b. Eh… yes and no. I wasn’t sure what to put here: I never lived in a dangerous neighbourhood, but where I lived was hardly safe at times, so let’s put “+” here. +

18f. Let’s say yes- people on TV are of the same race as I am. +
18b. Yes, I was often hesitant to reveal my family’s religious beliefs. +

19f. They did take me to museums, etc. I thought there was another similar question. +
19b. I am heterosexual. -